Author Topic: HOME SERVER QUESTION  (Read 1819 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline
***
HOME SERVER QUESTION
« on: March 07, 2023, 02:26:35 PM »
Exactly how is dns updates handled with a cwp house server where ip addresses are changed periodically.
Listen to everything Pixelpadre says.

Offline
****
Re: HOME SERVER QUESTION
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2023, 03:31:31 PM »
I suppose you could script it -- periodically query an outside DNS check then feed that result back into CWP's configs. What services would you be running?

Offline
***
Re: HOME SERVER QUESTION
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2023, 01:20:46 AM »
webpages only with 20 domains.  I mean, its basically static ip address.  Changes rarely.  I have https monitor with uptime robot.   I would know within minutes if the IP changed.  But thats not the problem.  The bigger problem is how to handle mail for these domains with dkim dmarc spf records for each domain.

Presumably, I would use my own dns servers on my house computer.......or would I be better off with registrar dns?   I have never given this much thought and now I am intrigued.  Cost of VPS is trending upwards.  i see  VPS  fees skyrocketing as these companies know that we have no other options.
Listen to everything Pixelpadre says.

Offline
***
Re: HOME SERVER QUESTION
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2023, 02:21:40 AM »
do you have to have a rDNS if you are only serving pages?
Listen to everything Pixelpadre says.

Offline
***
Re: HOME SERVER QUESTION
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2023, 03:35:46 PM »
Im thinking I can get a free ddns just for the server and then use the my own dns in cwp to hand dns for my domains?  Does that seem doable?
Listen to everything Pixelpadre says.

Offline
****
Re: HOME SERVER QUESTION
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2023, 09:07:25 AM »
I would say give it a try, but I only have personal experience with static IPs and business-class internet that specifically provides for servers in the user agreement. Some ISPs specifically block :443 and :80, as well as port 25 (SMTP).

For a home web server, you wouldn't need rDNS. And if your IP is essentially static or changes only rarely, you may be able to get away with dynamic DNS. I would definitely recommend running your DNS under Cloudflare since changes propagate worldwide in seconds. You'd want to have short TTLs set up in your use case for all DNS records.

Offline
***
Re: HOME SERVER QUESTION
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2023, 12:20:25 PM »
I would say give it a try, but I only have personal experience with static IPs and business-class internet that specifically provides for servers in the user agreement. Some ISPs specifically block :443 and :80, as well as port 25 (SMTP).

For a home web server, you wouldn't need rDNS. And if your IP is essentially static or changes only rarely, you may be able to get away with dynamic DNS. I would definitely recommend running your DNS under Cloudflare since changes propagate worldwide in seconds. You'd want to have short TTLs set up in your use case for all DNS records.

Wow, I havent seen a response like this in years.  Very useful, and it shows that you really understand what I am saying. 

Thanks for the cloudflare recommendation.   I was thinking no-ip or something like that.  But I am open to suggestions.  How does Pie-hole fit into this equation?
Listen to everything Pixelpadre says.

Offline
****
Re: HOME SERVER QUESTION
« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2023, 04:34:35 PM »
Well shucks, you're going to make me blush!

Actually, home servers are a bit of a specialty of mine, since I've been running home mail servers & FTP servers going on 25 years now. I've run the gamut on lowly DSL, better cable connections, fiber to the home, then shifted over to business fiber with static IPs and now I'm in data centers mostly with co-located servers on symmetric gigabit connections -- unmetered, with network engineering and remote hands support. So yeah, been there right where you are! So I know it's doable, but I also know some pitfalls (one major ISP blocks port 25, other large cable companies block port 80 upstream). So it's a fun hobby, but I'd also consider pro-level co-location or make sure running servers is explicitly allowed in your ToS (terms of service).

Here's some serious food for thought: buy a 2012 Mac mini and get it hosted with MacStadium or MacMiniVault/CyberLynk -- $50/mo. This gets you a quad core i7 with 16GB of memory, space for 2 onboard SATA SSDs. You can plugin 4 USB3 SSDs or backup flash drives. You don't have to run macOS either -- you can bare metal CentOS or AlmaLinux on it, or ESXi and run VMs. I've found this to be a very viable solution and haven't gone back to self-hosting, apart from a disaster recovery box local mirror.

Offline
***
Re: HOME SERVER QUESTION
« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2023, 11:12:25 PM »

Here's some serious food for thought: buy a 2012 Mac mini and get it hosted with MacStadium or MacMiniVault/CyberLynk -- $50/mo. This gets you a quad core i7 with 16GB of memory, space for 2 onboard SATA SSDs. You can plugin 4 USB3 SSDs or backup flash drives. You don't have to run macOS either -- you can bare metal CentOS or AlmaLinux on it, or ESXi and run VMs.
You lost me here.

Get a mac mini....ok.  Then get it hosted?   How do I get a local machine hosted and how do I add or remove ssd's?

Sorry, but I don't get any of that part.
Listen to everything Pixelpadre says.

Offline
****
Re: HOME SERVER QUESTION
« Reply #9 on: March 14, 2023, 01:08:06 AM »
Yes -- a Mac mini at a specialized boutique host (MacStadium or MacMiniVault). They will do co-location for $50-60/mo (owing to the small form factor and small power draw). For that, you get symmetric gigabit speeds, unlimited transfer. They offer "remote hands" support and will swap out parts or change out SSDs for you if you want to upgrade. I've had very good success with this route over the past 5+ years. 3 servers running CentOS 7.9 in a data center, on the cheap...